01 April 2013

New Plaques for Sylvia Plath

Has anyone else noticed that Google News and alerts has sucked recently (for something like the last four months)? I found this story today but, as usual, was not alerted to it via email, text, sky writing, carrier pigeon, etc.

London, AP--The recent news that the English Heritage has suspended the installation of Blue plaques has lead to last ditch efforts to commemorate landmarks associated with historical figures. Small amounts of money allotted for the plaques does remain, which has led to the quiet placement of additional blue plaques around England's capital city: London.

In conjunction with the recent 50th anniversary of both the publication of The Bell Jar and Sylvia Plath's death, English Heritage has installed several new, additional blue plaques in her honor in the Primrose Hill neighborhood that she loved.

The first house to receive the plaque is an unusual move: 23 Fitzroy Road. Citing that some of her most starkly beautiful and original poetry was composed here, as well as a few prose pieces that are undervalued for their wit, English Heritage installed the plaque recently in a private ceremony. English Heritage did not stop there.

Another blue plaque for Plath is rumored to ready for installation nearby at 11 St. George's Terrace, which faces Primrose Hill, as it is generally reported that much of Plath's novel, published under the pseudonym Victoria Lucas, was written here. Plath and Hughes both used the study here on borrow from Dido "Vessel of Wrath" and W. S. Merwin, the American poet. To commemorate the achievement of The Bell Jar, English Heritage and Faber are collaborating on a plaque which will incorporate the cover image of the 50th anniversary edition of the novel, published with fanfare and furore earlier in this year.


Rehan said...

This is great news. These blue plaques are usually placed to indicate that a certain somebody lived rather than wrote here.

Peter K Steinberg said...

Yes, it is great news. I saw several when I was in London last week that said so and so "lived and wrote" here. Maybe not those words exactly but the person's vocation was listed.


P.H.Davies said...

April Fools Peter!!!!!!!! Dido 'Vessel of Wrath' Merwin made me laugh loudly ha ha

Peter K Steinberg said...

You got me.


Nick Smart said...

Nice one, Peter!

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Publications & Acknowledgements

  • BBC Four.A Poet's Guide to Britain: Sylvia Plath. London: BBC Four, 2009. (Acknowledged in)
  • Biography: Sylvia Plath. New York: A & E Television Networks, 2005. (Photographs used)
  • Connell, Elaine. Sylvia Plath: Killing the angel in the house. 2d ed. Hebden Bridge: Pennine Pens, 1998. (Acknowledged in)
  • Crowther, Gail and Peter K. Steinberg. "These Ghostly Archives." Plath Profiles 2. Summer 2009: 183-208.
  • Crowther, Gail and Peter K. Steinberg. "These Ghostly Archives, Redux." Plath Profiles 3. Summer 2010: 232-246.
  • Crowther, Gail and Peter K. Steinberg. "These Ghostly Archives 3." Plath Profiles 4. Summer 2011: 119-138.
  • Crowther, Gail and Peter K. Steinberg. "These Ghostly Archives 4: Looking for New England." Plath Profiles 5. Summer 2012: 11-56.
  • Crowther, Gail and Peter K. Steinberg. "These Ghostly Archives 5: Reanimating the Past." Plath Profiles 6. Summer 2013: 27-62.
  • Crowther, Gail and Peter K. Steinberg. These Ghostly Archives: The Unearthing of Sylvia Plath. Oxford: Fonthill, 2017. Forthcoming.
  • Death Be Not Proud: The Graves of Poets. New York: Poets.org. (Photographs used)
  • Doel, Irralie, Lena Friesen and Peter K. Steinberg. "An Unacknowledged Publication by Sylvia Plath." Notes & Queries 56:3. September 2009: 428-430.
  • Gill, Jo. "Sylvia Plath in the South West." University of Exeter Centre for South West Writing, 2008. (Photograph used)
  • Elements of Literature, Third Course. Austin, Tex. : Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 2009. (Photograph used)
  • Helle, Anita Plath. The Unraveling Archive: Essays on Sylvia Plath. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2007. (Photographs used, acknowledged in)
  • Helle, Anita. "Lessons from the Archive: Sylvia Plath and the Politics of Memory". Feminist Studies 31:3. Fall 2005: 631-652.. (Acknowledged in)
  • Holden, Constance. "Sad Poets' Society." Science Magazine. 27 July 2008. (Photograph used)
  • Making Trouble: Three Generations of Funny Jewish Women, Motion Picture. Directed by Rachel Talbot. Brookline (Mass.): Jewish Women's Archive, 2007. (Photograph used)
  • Plath, Sylvia, and Karen V. Kukil. The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, 1950-1962. New York: Anchor Books, 2000. (Acknowledged in)
  • Plath, Sylvia, and Peter K. Steinberg and Karen V. Kukil (eds.). The Letters of Sylvia Plath. London: Faber, 2017. Forthcoming.
  • Plath, Sylvia. Glassklokken. Oslo: De norske Bokklubbene, 2004. (Photograph used on cover)
  • Reiff, Raychel Haugrud. Sylvia Plath: The Bell Jar and Poems (Writers and Their Works). Marshall Cavendish Children's Books, 2008.. (Images provided)
  • Steinberg, Peter K. Sylvia Plath (Great Writers). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers, 2004.
  • Steinberg, Peter K. "'I Should Be Loving This': Sylvia Plath's 'The Perfect Place' and The Bell Jar." Plath Profiles 1. Summer 2008: 253-262.
  • Steinberg, Peter K. "Sylvia Plath." The Spoken Word: Sylvia Plath. London: British Library, 2010.
  • Steinberg, Peter K. "'They Had to Call and Call': The Search for Sylvia Plath." Plath Profiles 3. Summer 2010: 106-132.
  • Steinberg, Peter K. "This is a Celebration: A Festschrift for The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath." Plath Profiles 3 Supplement. Fall 2010: 3-14.
  • Steinberg, Peter K. "A Perfectly Beautiful Time: Sylvia Plath at Camp Helen Storrow." Plath Profiles 4. Summer 2011: 149-166.
  • Steinberg, Peter K. "Proof of Plath." Fine Books & Collections 9:2. Spring 2011: 11-12.
  • Steinberg, Peter K. "Textual Variations in The Bell Jar Publications." Plath Profiles 5. Summer 2012.
  • Steinberg, Peter K. "Writing Life" [Introduction]. Sylvia Plath in Devon: A Year's Turning. Stroud, Eng.: Fonthill Media, 2014.