15 March 2009

Faber's 80th Sylvia Plath covers

On 7 May 2009, Faber will release two new editions of books by Plath: The Bell Jar and Selected Poems (selected and edited by Ted Hughes). These are part of their 80th anniversary editions. Here are the covers!



7 comments :

P.Viktor said...

Wow - very retro. I look forward to them coming out.

P

panther said...

I must say, I'm getting a little tired of ALL the Sylvia Plath poetry editions being selected/edited by Hughes.Not saying he didn't have a particular insight, obviously, just that other people's views could be very refreshing. Partly because they would be less defensive.

Annika said...

GORGEOUS!

Peter K Steinberg said...

I don't really read selected editions - preferring the collections assembled by the poet over anything else. Though, with Plath that's sometimes proven difficult since her most famous collection has two arrangements! And the whole mess with Crossing the Water and Winter Trees...

I think the covers are alright...

suki said...

The selected editions are a fine introduction to Plath's work. Why the "whole mess" with CTW and WT?
Does Hughes' non publication of Plath's Ariel still rankle after so long? and after Plath's Ariel was published?
They are both interesting works in their own right but equally lovely and if they allow people into some of the lesser known poems particularly Plath's poetry about children.
We have the CP if you do want the whole lot and it's terrific to see all the mature work , but I don't think the SP should be dismissed.

Peter K Steinberg said...

Hi Suki,

Crossing the Water and Winter Trees appear and read differently depending on which edition you read (Harper's versus Faber). As The Colossus appeared in different editions (Heinemann/Faber and Knopf), I guess Hughes did his best in editing these volumes of transitional and late poems, but the selections make for a different reading.

I agree that selected editions can be a fine introduction to Plath. I'd feel differently had Plath been able to select the poems herself, but that obviously wasn't the case.

To a certain degree I think that the different Ariel's is still a sensitive subject - but I'm still surprised at the relative quiet about the "Restored" Ariel - I just think with the stink that was raging through the 1980s its publication as Plath intended should have been bigger.

suki said...

I think that one of the reasons for the quiet about the Resored Ariel was that in the intervening years, we have had Plath's Collected Poems which is a much bigger work.


People are also able to read Ted Hughes and Plath together in poems like Pig/ Sow You Hated Spain/ the Goring and so on, allowing the reader to get a much broader picture of two great poets of the 20 th century.

This is not to say that the Restored Ariel wasn't worth it, I really liked having the Restored Ariel with(Plath's) spring ending. Just that it's part of a much bigger work.

Similiar, perhaps, to seeing that Colossus didn't come out of nowhere but in fact that Plath had worked at poetry for years.

I think too that Hughes' Birthday Letters answered some criticism there.

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